The Ultimutt doggy day out: Dogs Unleashed!

Dogs UnleashedWelcome to Dogs Unleashed the ultimutt doggy day out.  This years Dogs Unleashed will take place at The Bakewell Showground, Derbyshire on the 27th and 28th June 2015.

Dogs Unleashed is an exciting, fun filled and informative day out for the whole family. The event is excellent value for money with free entry for all your dogs!

The event will bring together the whole canine community through licensed competitions, displays, breed stands, welfare information and charity stalls and a vast amount of fun doggy activities. Its an excellent day out for anyone who has anything to do with dogs!

This fun and friendly show is the perfect environment for you to try out and experience many of the doggy sports and disciplines within the canine world, all in one day.

There are many activities and competitions at the event where you can personally get involved, just check out the attractions page.

Check their website for more details.

 

Choose a dog walk

Black Rocks Cromford

Black Rocks Cromford

Here are a few lovely dog walks that we have put together when you come up to the Peak District with your 4 legged friend!

Monyash Meander – a short 2 mile walk around the village of Monyash and surrounding dales. Finishing with a visit to either a dog friendly pub or cafe.

The Wild Rhubarb Walk – try some of the Monsal Trail, but then drop down to the riverside and enjoy the peace and tranquility and nature.

The Bakewell Loop – a fairly flat circular walk of about 3 miles, along parts of the Monsal Trail from Bakewell. Along the way you will pass Hassop Station which houses a coffee shop. There is space outside to sit undercover with your dog. Otherwise you need to find the dog friendly pubs and coffee shops in Bakewell itself.

The Cromford Canal and High Peak Incline  – a pleasant walk along the canal followed by an uphill climb along the High Peak trail and then drop back down into Cromford, where there are dog friendly pubs.

Black Rocks – is close to Cromford and is a great place to let your dog off lead. There are a choice of way marked paths you can follow.

All of the above walks allow your dog to be off the lead, there are other places that you can try some of which may require your dogs to be on the lead – particularly the National Trust walks - although some places are more lenient than others.

Finally there are Woodland walks which are usually offlead and offer your dog plenty of fun.

Hopefully one of these will take your fancy! Enjoy your walks.

 

 

Dog Friendly Pubs near Matlock

MoCa Bar: 77 Dale Rd, Matlock  Tel: 01629 258084
Children and dogs welcome. (Children until 7pm)

The Boat Inn: Scarthin, Cromford, Matlock, Derbyshire. DE4 3QF  Tel: 01629 258083

The Bell:  Cromford Hill, Cromford, Matlock, Derbyshire DE4 3RF Tel: 01629 822102

Red Lion: Main St, Birchover, Nr Matlock, Derbyshire. DE4 2BN  Tel: 01629 650363

Flying Childers: Main Rd, Stanton in Peak, Derbyshire. DE4 2LW   Tel: 01629 636333

Red Lion Hotel: Market Place, Wirksworth, Matlock, Derbyshire. DE4 4ET  Tel: 01629 822214

The Rising Sun: Rise End, Middleton, Matlock, Derbyshire. DE4 4LS  Tel: 01629 823247

The Miners Arms: Miners Hill, Brassington, Matlock. DE4 4HA  Tel: 01629 540222

 

 

 

 

 

Planning a Camping Trip with your dog in the Peak District

Camping with your dog

Camping with your dog

Camping is always a fun activity and it is a great way to holiday with your family and your dog. No kennel fees to pay and plenty of walking and fresh air to help you sleep well at night under canvas.

The Peak District is well known for being a great place to walk and there are plenty of campsites which cater for those holidaying with their dogs. Sites such as www.pitchup.com allow you to browse campsites and pick the best campsite for your needs. You can use the filter to search for dog friendly campsites.

To make this experience as problem free as possible, a little planning goes a long way.

If this is the first time that you have taken your dog camping you will need to ensure that they are as calm as possible. Expecting a dog to get used to a flapping tent at night, may take a bit of time. It is perhaps useful to pitch the tent nice and early in the day, and get the dog used to moving in and out of the tent. By the time evening comes, it will be happy to sleep in it.

Campsite Etiquette

Useful skewer for securing your dog when camping

Not every campsite accepts dogs, so you will to check beforehand and make sure you read the rules of the campsite. Dogs will need to be kept on a lead around the campsite and will not be allowed to roam free.  You can purchase long leads and stakes that skewer into the ground which you can attach your long leads to.

It pays to get the dog used to this before you begin your camping trip, the last thing you want is an agitated dog on holiday with you. A persistent barking dog will only upset your neighbouring campers and could end your stay earlier on the campsite than you intended.

In Case of Emergency

Whilst you are away, make sure that you aware of where your nearest vet is, just in case you require their services at short notice. A quick search on yell.com will identify this information. You should also need to ensure that the dog is up to date with inoculations.  Make sure your dog is micro chipped or at the very least is tagged with ID telephone no – just in case it gets lost.

Keep your dog comfortable

A comfortable dog is a happy dog and will settle well when it is expected to go to bed at night. Make sure that your pet is surrounded by familiar bedding and toys. You may consider taking a crate for your dog to sleep in at night. This might make it feel more secure and comfortable at night. Plan where the dog is going to sleep early on and place his bedding there so that he can get familiar with his sleeping area.

If you try and keep to familiar routines in terms of bedtimes the dog is likely to settle much easier.

During the day, particularly if it is quite warm, make sure you can find a spot with some shade for the dog.  It may be wise to find a pitch that is near the edge of the campsite, so that of you need to take it out last thing at night for a toilet stop, then you are not tripping over everyone else’s tent pegs to get out of the camp site.

Disposal of dog mess

Ensure that you dispose of all dog waste in the appropriate bins. Usually camp sites who allow dogs, will provide the appropriate disposal receptacles, but this is not always the case, so make sure you bring plenty of poop bags and ensure you know where the bins are for safe disposal.

A useful checklist

  • Water bowl and food bowl
  • Clean water supply/water receptacle
  • Towels for cleaning wet dogs and dirty paws
  • Toys to keep the dog amused
  • Treats for taking with you
  • Long lead and skewer/stake for attaching lead to on site
  • Bedding
  • Extra poop bags
  • First aid kit e.g. tick remover, antiseptic cream, bandages

Weekend Dog Walk – Fernilee Reservoir (Goyt Valley)

Dog walk in the Goyt ValleyThe Goyt Valley provides a great mixture of places for your dog to have some exercise. However, you need to be aware of the Countryside Code and ensure that if you are entering Open access land between the 1st March and 31st July you must ensure that your dog is kept on a short lead to protect ground nesting birds.

One of our favourite gentle walks is around Fernilee reservoir. There is limited parking in this area, but I have indicated 3 places on the map below, where you can park. If you use the zoom control on the map, you will notice that there are two access points from the A5004 (Long Hill) to Fernilee reservoir (one to the south of the reservoir and one to the north of the reservoir – both on the right hand side as you look at the map).  At the southerly access there is only space for 3 or 4 cars, but at the northerly access point, there is space for a few more, as you can park along the access road itself.

The Walk

Basically you can start at either end of the reservoir and walk either clock wise or anti clockwise around the reservoir.  You will see from the map, that there is a wooded area on the left of the reservoir (as you look at the map) and this has a lovely waterside path that you can follow. Alternatively you can start at the top end of the reservoir and walk down the wide stoned path towards Errwood reservoir, which is the start of the water that you can see on the map.

Tip: On a rainy day, it is much more sheltered walking through the wooded section, so you could just do a linear walk there and back on that side of the reservoir, should you choose to do so.

This is a very popular walk for dog walkers and other walkers, so your dog will have lots of opportunities to socialise with dogs and other people.

Pub nearby

The Shady Oak (Fernilee) this is a little bit further along Long Hill and is very dog friendly.

 

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Fernilee Reservoir loop

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Parking 1: 53.296286, -1.978612
Parking 2: 53.295388, -1.984105
Parking 3: 53.279097, -1.975608

Weekend Dog Walk – Solomons Temple (Buxton)

Solomons temple with cows and dogHere’s a walk if you find yourself in or around Buxton. On a clear day you will see spectacular panoramic views of Buxton and the surrounding area (if you walk up the steps and view from the top of Solomon’s temple).  That said, if you don’t fancy climbing the steps within the temple, then you get a pretty good view from the field at the foot of the temple.

Time: Allow between 40 mins and 1 hour (depending on how much exploring you want to do)

Distance: 1 – 1.5 miles (again, depending on whether you walk directly to the temple, or decide to meander around the fields).

The Walk:

  1. Park in the public car park for Poole’s Cavern (Postcode SK17 9DH). There is a small charge.
  2. Take the steps from the car park and walk into the woods. At the top of the steps you will turn left and follow the signs to Solomon’s Temple.
  3. When you get to the top of the stoned path, you will pass through a squeezer stile and then follow the path through the field towards the temple. The temple will be diagonally left across the field.
  4. You can climb the temple, to get an amazing 360 degrees view of Buxton and the surrounding area.
  5. Once you have reached the temple and explored it,  retrace your steps and back down the main path to the car park.

Dog Friendly snacks at Poole’s Cavern Cafe – very welcoming to dogs and have dog biscuits at the counter.

Nearby pub: The Duke at Burbage, SK17 6UR. Very dog friendly and good food.

Weekend Walk – Bakewell Meadows

Cross brookIt looks like the weather is going to be nice this weekend, perfect for a leisurely dog walk. Here’s an idea for a walk if you fancy a nice fairly flat walk. You can park in Bakewell town centre and start the walk from there, so you have plenty of options on your return for some four legged friendly refreshments.

The walk:

Time taken: Allow an hour

Distance: approx 2 miles

1. Starting from the Agricultural centre, walk towards Coombs Road. With the show ground office behind you, walk down the road, with the cafe on your left and the showground on your right. Continue along the road until you reach a gate.

2. Pass through the gate and turn right onto Coomb Road. Walk along this very quiet lane until you get to the end where the Monsal Trail starts on your left hand side. On your right you will notice a wide track and bridleway sign.

From Coombs road

3. Turn right and walk along the bridleway until you reach a gate on your right hand side. You cannot continue ahead, as it is a private road.

Sign at the end of bridleway

4. Pass through the gate and walk down through the field to the bottom sign post. You then turn right and pass through another gate.

sign at bottom of meadow

 

5. Now continue across several fields in a straight line, heading back towards the agricultural centre. You will negotiate a rather strange brook (see below). You can either walk across the plank, or bear to the left of the bush and walk through the more convenient gap in the hedge.

Cross brook

 

6. Continue towards the agricultural centre, keeping the road to the agricultural centre on your left and Coomb Road on your right.  At the very end of the last field, there is a gate in the left corner of the field, which you can pass through, and you will find yourself back at the show ground office building, where you first started.

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Bakewell Meadow Walk

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| | km | | /km | +m -m (net: m) | download GPX file download GPX file
Start of Walk: 53.212098, -1.669364
Coomb Road gate: 53.213692, -1.667476
Bridlepath/Monsal Trail intersection: 53.207575, -1.656532
Turn right into fields: 53.204310, -1.658077
Gate at end of field: 53.212072, -1.668506
Negotiate brook: 53.207292, -1.663313
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Start of Walk
Bakewell, United Kingdom
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Coomb Road gate
Bakewell, United Kingdom
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Bridlepath/Monsal Trail intersection
Bakewell, United Kingdom
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Turn right into fields
Bakewell, United Kingdom
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Gate at end of field
Bakewell, United Kingdom
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Negotiate brook
Bakewell, United Kingdom

Monkwood Cottage

outside-1

View from outside

The cottage sleeps up to 6 people and 4 dogs. It has 3 bedrooms, two double rooms and a twin room. 1 bathroom with bath and separate shower cubicle. A good sized kitchen and dining are, and a good sized lounge with a coal effect fire, freeview TV and a PS2 for games and dvd’s. We are also very pet friendly!

The cottage is a stones throw from Chatsworth House and Farm Park.
After a ten minute walk down the public foot path you come to the local fishery.
If you fancy a bite to eat or something to drink we have a cafe, 2 restaurants and a pub all in the village.

Lovely modern kitchen

Lovely modern kitchen

Fancy sitting in the hot tub?

Fancy sitting in the hot tub?

Contact: jemma-eville@hotmail.co.uk

Mobile: 07896 988713

Business address: Furnace Lane, Barlow, Derbyshire. S18 7SY

Facebook page

Weekend Walk – Linacre Reservoir

Linacre lower reservoir 2This is a lovely area to walk in, even though it is slightly outside of the Peak District proper.

We often call in here if we are visiting Chesterfield for some shopping and don’t want to leave the dogs behind for any length of time.

Linacre reservoir is owned by Severn Trent and has several pay and display car parks, which is where this particular walk starts. It costs £1 for two hours, which is not bad value at all. If you are lucky, you might even be able to buy an ice cream, if Frederick’s van is parked here.

There are several dog friendly pubs nearby:

The Peacock – at Cutthorpe

The Three Merry Lads – at Cutthorpe (they do a really nice Sunday Carvery and are very dog friendly)!

The Fox and Goose (Pudding Pie Hill S42 7JJ) – we’ve only just found out about this one! They have a lovely log fire for when it gets a bit colder….

The Walk

1. From the car park, walk through the gap and down the steps. Turn right at the bottom of the steps and walk towards the reservoir.

Linacre steps

2. Turn left and follow the well marked path alongside the reservoir. If you keep the water to your right and the grassland to your left, continue along the dam to the end of the path. Half way along, you will see spectacular views of the lower reservoir on your left and the middle reservoir on your right.

Linacre path along reservoirLinacre lower reservoir 2

3. At the end of the path, bear left and walk along the path through the woodland.

linacre forest path

4. At one point the path splits and there is a lower and an upper path. We took the upper path.

5. At the end of the path, turn left and walk along the path at the bottom of the lower reservoir.

6. This will take you to the bottom of some steps, or you can take the path to the right and avoid the steep steps. Assuming you have taken the path, turn left onto the path that you eventually meet and walk back up the hill, past the toilets. You will notice a gate on your left, which you can walk through and meet up with the path where the steps led down to from the car park. Retrace your steps back up to the car park.

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Linacre Reservoir

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| | km | | /km | +m -m (net: m) | download GPX file download GPX file
Start in Car park: 53.250194, -1.497574
Walk along dam of Reservoir: 53.249219, -1.499805
Walk up through woodland: 53.246574, -1.501307
Take higher path: 53.247601, -1.495600
Turn left and walk back across the dam: 53.247498, -1.494141
Up steps or along the path: 53.249244, -1.494398
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Start in Car park
Cutthorpe, United Kingdom
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Walk along dam of Reservoir
Cutthorpe, United Kingdom
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Walk up through woodland
Cutthorpe, United Kingdom
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Take higher path
Cutthorpe, United Kingdom
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Turn left and walk back across the dam
Cutthorpe, United Kingdom
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Up steps or along the path
Cutthorpe, United Kingdom

The Bakewell Loop

Tilly on the topDistance:     Approx 3.25 miles
Time:            Approx 1.5 hours
Grid Ref:      SK218685
Post Code:   DE45 1DS
Terrain:         Easy, flat, along the trail and paths.

This is a pleasant circular walk which follows part of the Monsal Trail and includes a public bridleway and some roads. There are some spectacular views of Bakewell as you make the return journey across the fields. Apart from the initial walk up the hill towards Bakewell Station, the rest of the walk is relatively flat and easy going.

Toilets: There are public toilets in Bakewell, next to Boots the Chemist.

Refreshments: There are plenty of coffee shops and tea rooms in Bakewell, but you will also pass Hassop Station Café on this walk, where you can sit outside in the covered seating area.

Directions:

  1. Starting from the pay and display car park behind the Tourist Information Centre, follow the road North East out of town and over the historical five arch stone bridge.
  2. Take a right turn and walk up Station Road signed towards the Industrial Estate. This leads to the old Bakewell Station. (You can start the walk here if you wish to, as there is a small pay and display car park outside the station). The Peak District National Park now owns the disused railway line and it forms part of the Monsal Trail. Walk down the left side of the station building and, turn left onto the Monsal Trail (signed Wye Dale). Walk along the trail for approximately 1 mile.
  3. As you approach Hassop Station, you will see several picnic tables and benches, ideal for a quick snack if you have your own food. Alternatively, there is a lovely café at Hassop Station, where you can stop off for refreshments if you wish. There are tables outside with a large outdoor covered seating area at the front of the building where you can take shelter with your dog if the weather is not so forgiving.
  4. Continue past Hassop Station walking under the bridge and staying on the trail. After about another ¼ mile turn left off the Monsal Trail onto a track (signposted Public Bridleway- a blue arrow on a black background) opposite the old Toll Bar House. The track is walled on either side, so your dog can stay off the lead. Just be aware, that there are several gates to pass through which have access to farmers’ fields, where livestock could be grazing. Please remain vigilant and put your dog on the lead if necessary. The stoned track eventually becomes a grassy track, and in wet weather can become a little muddy, but continue along it for approx 0.75 miles. There are fine views across the fields on either side of the track. The track is rather undulating, but as you reach the top of the last uphill section, you will be rewarded with lovely views of Bakewell and it’s church spire.
  5. When you reach the end of the track, you will pass through a gate into a field (ignore the signs to Great Longstone, which will be on your right). Please be aware, that there are often cattle and sheep in this field, so make sure your dog is on the lead. Follow the well trodden path down through the field, following the blue arrowed bridleway sign. At the bottom of the field, pass through the gate and continue to the bottom of the track, bearing right as you walk past Holme Hall which will be on your left. The track will join up with a minor road.
  6. Once you reach the road (where the entrance to the Riverside Business Park is on your right,) turn left and follow the road until you reach a footpath (accessed by a gate) on your right. Note: There is a poop bin, just by the entrance to the Riverside Business Park. You can now walk across the meadow to the next set of gates.
  7. At the corner of the meadow, there are two gates, one takes you up onto the road and the other continues into the next meadow, along a narrow stone path. Follow the path which takes you to another gate and into the field beyond. From here, follow the footpath across the field and towards the stone bridge.
  8. Once at the bridge, turn right and walk across the bridge back into Bakewell.
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    The Bakewell Loop

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    | | km | | /km | +m -m (net: m) | download GPX file download GPX file
    Start: 53.213525, -1.673870
    Station Road: 53.217328, -1.668913
    Hassop Station: 53.231112, -1.676230
    Bridleway: 53.233501, -1.680951
    End of track: 53.221963, -1.681445
    Bottom of field: 53.219146, -1.681278
    Footpath through meadow: 53.217816, -1.677625
    Gates: 53.216917, -1.673634
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    Start
    Tourist Information centre bakewell
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    Station Road
    Station Road, Bakewell, United Kingdom
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    Hassop Station
    Hassop Station Cafe and Monsal Trail Cycle Hire, Bakewell, United Kingdom
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    Bridleway
    Hassop Station Cafe and Monsal Trail Cycle Hire, Bakewell, United Kingdom
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    End of track
    Bakewell, United Kingdom
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    Bottom of field
    Bakewell, United Kingdom
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    Footpath through meadow
    Bakewell, United Kingdom
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    Gates
    Bakewell, United Kingdom

Weekend Walk – Cromford

Cromford walk photo 1Tilly, Mackie and I decided to do an experimental walk along Cromford Canal this week. The reason I say it’s experimental is because dog walks have taken on a whole new meaning now that I have two dogs! Particularly since one is still only a puppy, but at 12 months old, he’s a big one!  At the moment we are doing a lot of lead walks, but that’s only because I don’t have the perfect recall with them together.

Anyhow, the walk that I am about to describe is approximately 2 miles long and took me about one hour. It has a steep uphill section, but is a real mixture of canal paths, woodland and road walking. Hopefully a little bit of everything for everyone.  There are also refreshment stops along the way too.

The Walk

1. Park at Cromford Wharf car park DE4 3RQ.  It is a pay and display (it cost me £1.30 for two hours, which I didn’t think was too bad).

2. From the canal, turn left and walk towards the canal. You must turn left and walk down the canal towards High Peak Junction. Many people walk their dogs along here, and many of them will be off lead. There are poop bins to be found at High Peak junction and I’m pretty sure I passed one at the start of the canal walk at Cromford Wharf.  It’s approximately 1 mile to the High Peak Junction. There are refreshments served here if you wish.Cromford walk photo 2

3. Upon arriving at High Peak Junction, you need to cross the bridge and head behind the buildings, following a path which is called the Sheep Pastures incline.  You will walk through a short tunnel onto the trail. This is the long steep part of the walk. Dogs are fine to be off lead once you are on this path.  The footpath that you are on, follows what was the Cromford and High Peak Railway. You will pass a “catch pit” which was designed to capture run away trains of which there were a few!

4. Continue walking up this hill and walk past the small brick building which will be on your right. Shortly afterwards, you will see a footpath sign on your left. This is where the High Peak Trail (which is what you are on) intersects with the Midshires Trail. You will notice that you are on what I can only describe as a bridge section. Once you turn left you will almost double back on yourself and effectively go underneath the High Peak Trail. Follow the signpost to Cromford (turn left). You will walk down a track, again dogs are still OK off lead, but be aware that this track turns into a road very shortly.

Cromford walk photo 3

5. The track peters out and becomes Intake Lane. Follow this lane downhill (ignoring all turnings) and eventually you will meet the A6, which is a very busy main road. Turn left along the A6 and walk up to the traffic light junction, be very careful of the traffic and keep your dogs on a short lead.   (Note: To avoid walking along the A6 pavement, apparently there is a gap in the wall opposite Intake Lane, when you meet the A6, I didn’t see this path, but apparently this will cut the corner where the road junction is, but I don’t know how easy it would be to cross the road at this point).

6. At the junction, turn right into Mill Road and walk back towards the Cromford Wharf car park.

Below I have shown a map, where the blue marker shows where the walk starts. If you move the map across to the right, you can see the footpaths that I have described. I am still working on how to use these maps properly, so you will have to bear with me! The OS map OL24 is the correct Ordnance Survey map to use, if you have one.

For nearby pubs click here

You might also be interested in this post for dog friendly cafes.

Enjoy your dog walk!

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Cromford Wharf

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Cromford Wharf 53.109741, -1.554179 Cromford Mill, Mill Road, Matlock, United Kingdom (Directions)

 

 

Derbyshire Well Dressings – a doggie day out!

tissington-well-dressing-thursday-029Derbyshire is famous for it’s age-old tradition of Well Dressing. Over 80 towns and villages decorate their wells with natural materials, such as plants, flowers, bark and other natural ingredients. These are all artistically arranged to produce fantastic works of art, that are displayed by the wells. There is often a theme to the well dressing, anything from biblical stories to special celebrations.

The well dressing celebrations often last for a few days and are often incorporated into Carnival weeks and other special events.

This offers a lovely opportunity to add some interest to your everyday dog walks. Why not incorporate a dog walk around one of the towns or villages that is taking part in the well dressings. There are often dog friendly pubs and tea shops nearby, so you can really make a day of it.

For a complete list of well dressing dates for 2015 click here

Enjoy!